The Energy Singularity Challenge at Odyssey Momentum, led by Grid Singularity and Engie, and further supported by Stedin, Alliander, Enpuls and E.ON, as well as the Florence School of Regulation, engaged diverse stakeholders to simulate, experiment and advance the deployment of agent-based bottom-up energy markets. The Energy Singularity Challenge took place virtually on 13–15 November 2020, with the first challenge stream exploring the technical deployment of peer-to-peer energy markets, and the second stream soliciting new ways of engaging with consumers and prosumers to optimise and rethink an individual’s relationship with energy. …


On July 16–18, 2020, a virtual live experiment took place to test the hypothesis of an agent-based bottom up energy market by simulating the conditions of a future smart grid. Intelligent trading bots with competing incentives designed by three teams, including experts from Inavitas energy intelligence platform, Greenlytics weather analytics solutions for the energy industry, and OLI Systems collaborating with Siemens and insmart.ai, faced off in an interconnected local energy market simulation enabled by Grid Singularity’s energy platform. They predicted energy prices, placed bids and offers for energy and optimised placement of energy assets, reacting to changing market conditions such as flexible grid fees designed by a grid operator team including Stedin, Alliander, Enpuls, and E.ON. …


In collaboration with Bündnis Bürgerenergie e.V. (BBEn), Grid Singularity conducted a study, using its open source energy exchange simulation tool and the dataset provided by the EWS Elektrizitätswerke Schönau eG, to assess the feasibility of local energy markets in Germany, reducing overall grid usage while maximising economic and social benefits of distributed renewable resources for citizens. This article, co-authored by BBEn and Grid Singularity, presents the study approach and the main findings.

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The Approach

The approach taken in the study and in Grid Singularity’s software solutions is that the energy market design should reflect today’s user-centric model, accentuated by the rise of prosumers and recognised in the new European legislation (RED II). This approach posits that traditional consumers, whether they be prosumers or just optimising a base load, ought to be enabled to participate in the local electricity market and benefit from trading on an equal footing with the large incumbents. Grid operators continue to play a critical role in this system, benefiting from optimised access to flexibility and reduced grid congestion. …


Mukund Wadhwa’s thesis, ‘Analysis of Local Electricity Markets in Germany using Simulation’, completed in June 2020 in the scope of a Masters program in sustainable systems engineering at the University of Freiburg, explores local electricity markets using Grid Singularity’s D3A simulation tool, within the bounds of the German energy and regulatory system. This article explains the Local Electricity Market (LEM) concept and its benefits to the broader, interested public by discussing Mukund’s research results, in an interview led by Grid Singularity’s Colin Andrews.

Evaluating the Impact of Local Electricity Markets

The grid as it exists today was designed for energy to flow in one direction — from large producers to final consumers like you and me. Local electricity markets (LEMs) empower the consumer to take control of their energy footprint, allowing the exchange of locally produced energy among members of a community, improving community self-sufficiency (share of locally procured energy) and reducing energy bills. …


This article describes the main results of a University of Freiburg master thesis, which deployed Grid Singularity’s D3A software to prove the hypothesis that Local Electricity Markets (LEMs) bring economic benefits to individuals in energy communities, while lowering dependence on the wholesale market, reducing grid transmissions and balancing local consumption and generation.

Two different market mechanisms, namely Pay-as-Bid and Pay-as-Clear, are discussed and compared with respect to the self-consumption, traded energy and net electricity costs of the community in producer-centred and prosumer-centred LEMs. …


A bottom-up, community energy model could transform our energy system to be more democratic, sustainable and stable. The European Union has recently laid the legal foundations for this reconstruction. Now it’s up to the Member States and local authorities to ensure the concept will flourish, democratically accelerating decarbonisation.

The underlying benefits of the community energy models

According to a 2016 study by CE Delft, the potential of citizens’ contribution to the energy market is significant: “83% of the EU’s households could potentially become an energy citizen and contribute to renewable energy production, demand response and/or energy storage, which amounts to about 187 million households. About half of the households, around 113 million, may have the potential to produce energy.” …


The commitment made to the energy transition resulted in numerous incentive schemes, spurring growth in renewable power capacity in the European Union and globally. In 2019, the production of wind and solar energy was higher than energy produced with coal in Germany for the first time. This positive trend, however, also created a challenge in that the installed capacity of renewable energy outgrew the capacity of the distribution grid, impeding the systems operators to effectively transmit the energy to the final consumer. As a result, they have called for innovative tools to enable, “market-based activation of explicit flexibilities that are able to alter power flows.” Energy asset owners, from individual households to communities, could also use such tools for more optimal energy consumption, while contributing to wider market flexibility. …


At the Odyssey Hackathon Energy Singularity Track, on June 19–21, 2020, developers and energy market stakeholders will be brought together to simulate, experiment and advance the thesis of an agent-based, bottom-up energy market. Building upon Grid Singularity’s open source energy exchange engine (d3a.io), which enables users to model, simulate, and deploy peer-to-peer energy marketplaces, teams will compete to streamline communication and coordination among all stakeholders to create a more efficient, secure and inclusive energy market design by:

● designing multiparty market interaction through APIs and intelligent agents

● testing trading strategies and methods to improve local energy community KPIs, such as their energy bill, level of self-sufficiency or grid…


Grid Singularity’s Proof-of-Concept Collaboration with the Hague’s Groene Mient Community

Technological advances and favorable policy support have resulted in renewable energy sources progressively reaching grid-parity, with the cost of electric power derived from a rooftop solar system becoming equal or even lower than that purchased from a utility in an increasing number of geographies. As energy generation shifts towards the lower voltage levels of the power grid, the role of the household in the energy market becomes increasingly important. …

About

Grid Singularity

Engineering d3a.io, open source software that simulates and operates custom energy exchanges, creating local marketplaces that interconnect to form a smart grid

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